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Saint Etienne

du Mont

Place Sainte-Geneviève, 75005 Paris

Orgue de tribune OdC >

D5 The organcase of Saint Etienne du Mont dates from 1633 and was built by Jean Buron. It is a real masterpiece and perhaps the most beautiful organ case in Paris and the oldest case which is preserved completely. It originally housed an instrument of about thirty stops and 4 keyboards of 48 notes and pedal of 32 notes (!) built by Pierre Pescheur. Some of the 16th century piping has been reused. In 1656, work was carried out by Jean De Heman and Pierre Desenclos. In 1717, Julien Tribuot restored the five wedge-shaped bellows and added Flute stops to the Pedal. In 1760, the organ was damaged by a fire. In 1766, Somer began the restoration. After his death in 1771, it was François-Henri Cliquot who took over the work, which was not completed until 1777. The range of the keyboards was increased from 48 to 50 notes, the windchest of the Positif as well as the wind tunnel and mechanics were rebuilt. The reeds were rebuilt, a new oboe placed in the Positive, the Trumpet of the Swell replaced by an oboe and a Bombarde 16' added to the pedal. In 1863-1873, the organ was rebuilt by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll. The number of keyboards was reduced to three, including a completely new Récit of 42 notes. A 16' Bombarde was added to the Great Organ. The organ then included 39 stops. In 1911, Théodore Puget performed an overhaul, enlarged the Récit to 50 notes and added 5 combination pedals and in 1922, he electrified the wind tunnel. In 1956, Beuchet-Debierre rebuilt and radically enlarged the instrument in a neo-classical style, under the supervision of its titulaire Maurice Duruflé. The organ was increased to 87 stops on four keyboards and pedalboard. About thirty stops including those of the Pedal are located outside the buffet. The transmission of keyboards and stops was electrified and a new detached console was placed on the north side gallery. In 1975, Gonzalez reharmonized the organ (by Jacques Bertrand) and added two stops. In 1991, the organ was restored by Bernard Dargassies with some alterations of harmony, in consultation with Marie Madeleine Duruflé. In 2012 Dargassies carried out an overhaul. The Great Organ of the church of St-Etienne-du-Mont now has 89 stops (83 real) and it is controlled from an electric console of 4 keyboards, installed on a side stand by Victor Gonzalez, the old console between the buffet of the Great and the back positive having been removed. 39 stops date from before the revolution, but they are severely modified (only 7 stops are still located on their original place); 6 stops date from Cavaillé-Coll.
Eugène Atget, 1912
Photo of the church: Charles Aknin St-Etienne-du-Mont was built between 1492 and 1626 as the chapel of an abbey dedicated to the patroness of Paris, St. Geneviève. A chapel contains a reliquary, though her bones were burned during the revolution. The site itself is much older, dating back to the 6th century , when Clovis (466-511) founded the abbey. Remains of the ancient abbey, situated south of the church, comprise the Tour de Clovis (Tower of Clovis, lower part 11th century), the cloister (15th century) and the reflectory (1220), which are now part of the Lycée Henri IV. The church displays a mixture of Renaissance and Gothic styles. The vaults of the apse were built in 1491, the chancel in 1537, the gallery in 1545 and the vaults of the nave and the transept were finished in 1580. The portal was built in 1610 and the bell tower in 1624. In particular the rood screen (jubé, probably by Pierre Beaucorps in 1530) crossing the nave like a bridge with spiral staircases on either side is an unique feature of the church, being the only rood screen which survived in Paris. The wood pulpit (1651) is supported by Samson with a jawbone in hand and slain lion at his feet. The fourth chapel on the right from the entrance contains 16th-century stained glass. Mid-19th century, the chapelle des cathéchismes was added.
Photo : Thibault Hoch (facebook)
Photos : Ralph Gho (facebook)
1636 - Pescheur (1) 1656 - Jean de Héman/Pierre Désenclos (6) 1679 - J. Carouge (6) 1717 - J. Tribuot (6) 1766-77 - Somer/Clicquot (5) 1863-73 - Cavaillé-Coll (3a) 1911 - Puget (5) 1928 - Koenig (6) 1956 - Beuchet-Debierre (3a) 1975 - Gonzalez (3a) 1992 - Dargassies (5) 2012 - Dargassies (6)

IV/89 (83) - traction électrique

composition

Organiste titulaire Thierry Escaisch & Vincent Warnier Famous organists in the past: Guillaume Lasceux (1774- 1819), Maurice Duruflé (1929-1986), Marie-Madeleine Duruflé-Chevalier ( 1947-1996). Concerts Occasionnelly Masses with organ Saturday 6:45 PM, Sunday 11:00 AM and 6:45 PM Videos Thierry Escaich: 4 improvisations Vincent Warnier: improvisation Pétur Sakari: improvisation Pétur Sakari: Louis Vierne (Allegro Symphony 2) Pétur Sakari: Jehan Alain (Litanies) Marie-Madeleine Duruflé-Chevalier à l'Orgue de l'église Saint-Etienne du Mont à Paris. Enregistré en 1961. Marie-Madeleine Duruflé Chevalier à l'orgue de l'église Saint-Etienne du Mont à Paris. enregistré en 1991. Photo buffet : Jeroen de Haan
Photos : Ralph Gho (facebook)
The organs of Paris

Saint Etienne

du Mont

Place Sainte-Geneviève, 75005 Paris

Orgue de tribune OdC >

ORGANS OF PARIS © 2023 Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS
D5 The organcase of Saint Etienne du Mont dates from 1633 and was built by Jean Buron. It is a real masterpiece and perhaps the most beautiful organ case in Paris and the oldest case which is preserved completely. It originally housed an instrument of about thirty stops and 4 keyboards of 48 notes and pedal of 32 notes (!) built by Pierre Pescheur. Some of the 16th century piping has been reused. In 1656, work was carried out by Jean De Heman and Pierre Desenclos. In 1717, Julien Tribuot restored the five wedge-shaped bellows and added Flute stops to the Pedal. In 1760, the organ was damaged by a fire. In 1766, Somer began the restoration. After his death in 1771, it was François-Henri Cliquot who took over the work, which was not completed until 1777. The range of the keyboards was increased from 48 to 50 notes, the windchest of the Positif as well as the wind tunnel and mechanics were rebuilt. The reeds were rebuilt, a new oboe placed in the Positive, the Trumpet of the Swell replaced by an oboe and a Bombarde 16' added to the pedal. In 1863-1873, the organ was rebuilt by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll. The number of keyboards was reduced to three, including a completely new Récit of 42 notes. A 16' Bombarde was added to the Great Organ. The organ then included 39 stops. In 1911, Théodore Puget performed an overhaul, enlarged the Récit to 50 notes and added 5 combination pedals and in 1922, he electrified the wind tunnel. In 1956, Beuchet-Debierre rebuilt and radically enlarged the instrument in a neo-classical style, under the supervision of its titulaire Maurice Duruflé. The organ was increased to 87 stops on four keyboards and pedalboard. About thirty stops including those of the Pedal are located outside the buffet. The transmission of keyboards and stops was electrified and a new detached console was placed on the north side gallery. In 1975, Gonzalez reharmonized the organ (by Jacques Bertrand) and added two stops. In 1991, the organ was restored by Bernard Dargassies with some alterations of harmony, in consultation with Marie Madeleine Duruflé. In 2012 Dargassies carried out an overhaul. The Great Organ of the church of St-Etienne-du-Mont now has 89 stops (83 real) and it is controlled from an electric console of 4 keyboards, installed on a side stand by Victor Gonzalez, the old console between the buffet of the Great and the back positive having been removed. 39 stops date from before the revolution, but they are severely modified (only 7 stops are still located on their original place); 6 stops date from Cavaillé-Coll.
Organiste titulaire Thierry Escaich & Vincent Warnier Famous organists in the past: Guillaume Lasceux (1774- 1819), Maurice Duruflé (1929-1986), Marie-Madeleine Duruflé-Chevalier ( 1947-1996). Concerts Ocasionally Masses with organ Saturday 6.45 PM Sunday 11.00 AM, 6.45 PM Videos Thierry Escaich: 4 improvisations Vincent Warnier: improvisation Pétur Sakari: improvisation Pétur Sakari: Louis Vierne (Allegro Symphony 2) Pétur Sakari: Jehan Alain (Litanies)
Photo : Thibault Hoch (facebook)
1636 - Pescheur (1) 1656 - Jean de Héman/Pierre Désenclos (6) 1679 - J. Carouge (6) 1717 - J. Tribuot (6) 1766-77 - Somer/Clicquot (5) 1863-73 - Cavaillé-Coll (3a) 1911 - Puget (5) 1928 - Koenig (6) 1956 - Beuchet-Debierre (3a) 1975 - Gonzalez (3a) 1992 - Dargassies (5) 2012 - Dargassies (6)

IV/89 (83) - traction électrique

composition