The organs of Paris
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Saint Vincent

de Paul 1 2

Place Frantz-Liszt, 75010 Paris

Orgue de tribune

1852 - Cavaillé-Coll

1970 - Gonzalez

2010 - Dargassies

III/66 - electrical traction - stoplist

Photos of the organ: Jeroen de Haan
Organiste titulaire Pierre Cambourian Famous organists in the past: G. Lemmens, Léon Boellmann, Louis Braille, Jean Costa Concerts Seldom

Masses with organ

Saturday 6:30 PM, Sunday 10:30 AM and 6:30 PM Videos Jean Costa
The parish of St Vincent de Paul was established in 1802 and met in a dilapidated premises until the construction of the present church. The project of a new church was entrusted to Jean-Baptiste Lepère (1761-1844), who had accompanied Bonaparte to Egypt. He quickly associated his son-in-law Jacques- Ignace Hittorff (1792-1867) with the company. The first stone of a basilica building was laid in 1824. But the economic crisis of 1826 and the revolution of 1830 stopped the work. Finally, in 1832, the project passed into the hands of Hittorff, who remodeled it in his own way. The church was consecrated in 1844. The style of the church is inspired by ancient Roman basilicas. The interior, with its abundant decoration, has many works of art designed by Hippolyte Flandrin, François Rude ,Charles-Laurent Maréchal. The church is preceded by a square bearing the name of Aristide Cavaillé-Coll!
Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, after submitting two proposals, was responsible for the construction of the great organ, which was inaugurated on 26 January 1852 by the titulaire Peters Cavallo and the organist Louis-James-Alfred Lefébure-Wély. It was on this instrument that Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens was heard several times during the month of February 1852 in front of an elite audience, marvelling at the perfection of his technique as well as by the grandeur and severity of his style. Cavaillé-Coll applied many innovative ideas of organ- making, including the principle of piston springs, developed by Eberhard-Friedrich Walcker of Ludwigsburg around 1845, and the use of glass for the walls of the expressive box. The buffet, designed by the architect of the church, Jacques-Ignace Hittorff, and executed by Napoleon Liénard for sculpture and by Poncet for carpentry, presents an original layout with its two separate bodies to show the rosette pierced in the axis of the façade. In 1859 Cavaillé-Coll made an overhaul and took the opportunity to move the console to a side stand (it was previously on the grandstand). Subsequently, work was carried out by Mutin (circa 1927). In 1961, the factor Jean Hermann was responsible for electrifying the instrument and enlarging the instrument, but the builder died during the work and it was Gonzalez who completed the instrument. Fortunately, it was decided to forego the addition of neo-baroque stops and a 4th keyboard. Gonzalez returned in 1979 to clean the instrument following a fire in the building in 1972. Currently, 49 out of 66 stops are still of Cavaillé-Coll, which are very little retouched.
Léon Boëllmann à l’orgue Cavaillé-Coll
The new console (Jean Costa) (The fourth manual is empty)
The old console (Jean Costa)
Photo : Gaspard de la Motte
The organs of Paris

Saint Vincent

de Paul 1 2

Place Frantz-Liszt, 75010 Paris

Orgue de tribune

1852 - Cavaillé-Coll

1970 - Gonzalez

2010 - Dargassies

III/66 - electrical traction - stoplist

Photos of the organ: Jeroen de Haan
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS
Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, after submitting two proposals, was responsible for the construction of the great organ, which was inaugurated on 26 January 1852 by the titulaire Peters Cavallo and the organist Louis-James-Alfred Lefébure-Wély. It was on this instrument that Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens was heard several times during the month of February 1852 in front of an elite audience, marvelling at the perfection of his technique as well as by the grandeur and severity of his style. Cavaillé-Coll applied many innovative ideas of organ- making, including the principle of piston springs, developed by Eberhard-Friedrich Walcker of Ludwigsburg around 1845, and the use of glass for the walls of the expressive box. The buffet, designed by the architect of the church, Jacques- Ignace Hittorff, and executed by Napoleon Liénard for sculpture and by Poncet for carpentry, presents an original layout with its two separate bodies to show the rosette pierced in the axis of the façade. In 1859 Cavaillé-Coll made an overhaul and took the opportunity to move the console to a side stand (it was previously on the grandstand). Subsequently, work was carried out by Mutin (circa 1927). In 1961, the factor Jean Hermann was responsible for electrifying the instrument and enlarging the instrument, but the builder died during the work and it was Gonzalez who completed the instrument. Fortunately, it was decided to forego the addition of neo-baroque stops and a 4th keyboard. Gonzalez returned in 1979 to clean the instrument following a fire in the building in 1972. Currently, 49 out of 66 stops are still of Cavaillé-Coll, which are very little retouched.
Organiste titulaire Pierre Cambourian Famous organists in the past: G. Lemmens, Léon Boellmann, Louis Braille, Jean Costa Concerts Seldom

Masses with organ

Saturday 6:30 PM, Sunday 10:30 AM and 6:30 PM Videos Jean Costa