The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © 2021 Vincent Hildebrandt HOME ALL ORGANS

Saint Ambroise

71 bis, boulevard Voltaire, 75011 Paris Orgue de tribune

1869 - Merklin-Schutze

196x - Gutschenritter

1980 - Picaud

1987/89 - Cicchero

2000 - Dargassies

III/32 - mechanical traction -

stoplist

Orgue de choeur

1896 - Merklin

2005 - Dargassies

II/12 (13) - mechanical traction -

stoplist

photo GO: Jeroen de Haan
Organiste titulaire Julien Bret Famous organists in the past: Georges Mac Master, Paul Silva Hérard Concerts Seldom

Masses with organ

Saturday 6:30 p.m., Sunday 9, 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Vidéos Julien Bret
The current church was built from 1863 to 1868, according to the plans and under the direction of the architect Théodore Ballu, shortly after the drilling of the "Boulevard du Prince-Eugène" (former name of the "Boulevard Voltaire. It replaced a first church built in the early nineteenth century. His style is a mixture of neo-Gothic, neo-Romanesque and neo-Byzantine, very popular at that time, especially in the French capital.
The Great Organ was built by the Merklin-Schutze workshops in 1869. The archives report that the buffet was laid later after the inauguration of the instrumental part (probably in 1870). The instrument then underwent the interventions of Mutin, Gutschenritter, Picaud and Cicchero. Apart from two stops of the Positive, the instrument is entirely authentic.
The organs of Paris

Saint Ambroise

71 bis, boulevard Voltaire, 75011 Paris Orgue de tribune

1869 - Merklin-Schutze

196x - Gutschenritter

1980 - Picaud

1987/89 - Cicchero

2000 - Dargassies

III/32 - mechanical traction -

stoplist

Orgue de choeur

1896 - Merklin

2005 - Dargassies

II/12 (13) - mechanical traction -

stoplist

photo GO: Jeroen de Haan
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS
Organiste titulaire Julien Bret Famous organists in the past: Georges Mac Master, Paul Silva Hérard Concerts Seldom

Masses with organ

Saturday 6:30 p.m., Sunday 9, 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Vidéos Julien Bret
The Great Organ was built by the Merklin-Schutze workshops in 1869. The archives report that the buffet was laid later after the inauguration of the instrumental part (probably in 1870). The instrument then underwent the interventions of Mutin, Gutschenritter, Picaud and Cicchero. Apart from two stops of the Positive, the instrument is entirely authentic.